Online & On-Air

Connect with peers and build local solutions for soil health, streams and fish habitat   

Boots on the Ground

Online Conversations

Boots on the Ground conversations introduce local groups working for sustainable farms and streams. Learn about their projects and challenges, how they organize, and how they make progress. 

 

Neighbor to Neighbor

Podcasts

Neighbor to Neighbor radio features interviews with Midwest neighbors who are working together for resilient farms, soil, streams and fish. Hear their varied perspectives on shared work, and what it means to make progress as a community.

View other news

Develop a Clear Lease Arrangement

September 6, 2022
Matt Russell, resilient agriculture coordinator for Drake University Agricultural Law Center, says he frequently hears from farm landowners who wish they’d put[...] View more
× Matt Russell, resilient agriculture coordinator for Drake University Agricultural Law Center, says he frequently hears from farm landowners who wish they’d put conservation goals in lease agreements. “They want conservation on the land,” he explains, “but often lack the language, experience, and social support to initiate it.” Landowners who are clear about their role and goals can improve the condition of land while building productivity and income. Russell, who fields calls for Drake's Sustainable Land Tenure Initiative, observes that landowners typically drive conservation on leased land, but a farm lease arrangement is always a partnership. Read the full story HERE.
×
View other news

Wisconsin’s Vetrano: Innovate, Invite Collaboration

September 6, 2022
For more 30 years biologist Dave Vetrano turned his energies toward improving streams and fish populations in Wisconsin’s[...] View more
× For more 30 years biologist Dave Vetrano turned his energies toward improving streams and fish populations in Wisconsin’s west central region. Now he grazes and direct-markets jersey steers from his farm near Bangor, Wisconsin and is a passionate advocate for grazing. This change in direction is not retirement. Vetrano is building a business and seizing the chance to live what he learned while adding 400 miles to the region’s classified trout waters and reintroducing native brook trout. Read the full story HERE.
×
View other news

At Indian Creek, Collaboration Shifts Local Norms

September 6, 2022
Five years after a local steering committee assembled in Indian Creek watershed for the first time, conservation practices[...] View more
× Five years after a local steering committee assembled in Indian Creek watershed for the first time, conservation practices are being used on more than 50% of farmland in the basin. Interest in best practices and stream health is high, and community-driven outreach has transformed the way nutrients are used on local farmland. Read the full story HERE.
×
View other news

The Watershed Leaders Network

August 22, 2022
How can we work together to protect soil and water on our farms? Fishers & Farmers workshops connect[...] View more
× How can we work together to protect soil and water on our farms? Fishers & Farmers workshops connect farmers, landowners, and collaborators with others who are working for sustainable farms, streams and communities in the Upper Mississippi River Basin. At our interactive, no-lecture, professionally-facilitated events participants hear new perspectives, ask questions that matter, host conversations, tell stories of challenge and success, reflect, and identify their own next steps. It is a rich, practical way to learn. Click HERE to watch the video.
×
View other news

Farmers Lead For Healthier Soil and Water

August 22, 2022
Post holidays, a farmer in the Upper Mississippi River Basin might choose to sit back and enjoy time[...] View more
× Post holidays, a farmer in the Upper Mississippi River Basin might choose to sit back and enjoy time with family and friends. The harvest is in after a season of record flood events. The crop now sits in elevators, ethanol plants, co-ops or river barges destined for markets. Some cover crops of rye are planted, and bales of alfalfa are rolled into hay ready to feed livestock through months of wintry winds. Yet, in Dubuque, Iowa, a group of farmers, fishers, watershed project coordinators, a planner, an excavator, and a crop consultant from across five states stands in front of an expansive floor-to-ceiling map of the Mississippi River Basin. As they point to where their farms and watersheds sit in this massive basin, they share stories of how their home areas impact the Mississippi River. Here, at the National Mississippi River Museum & Aquarium, they learn from each other about challenges they face as leaders in their own agricultural watersheds, and explore solutions. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Working Together Locally For Farms, Streams and Economic Growth

August 22, 2022
It takes local leaders with diverse expertise working together, with understanding of local conditions and markets: farmers, crop[...] View more
× It takes local leaders with diverse expertise working together, with understanding of local conditions and markets: farmers, crop consultants, agriculture retailers, bankers, fishermen, biologists, mapping professionals and soil scientists. Striking a balance that benefits all is a delicate one that means building working relationships between partners. In upper Midwest communities now, farming landowners and their agricultural support networks are stepping up to change practices on the land, and invite others to consider the options. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Root Causes, Root Solutions

August 22, 2022
Steph and Josh Dahl recently added a manure storage facility and calf barn to their 160-cow dairy operation.[...] View more
× Steph and Josh Dahl recently added a manure storage facility and calf barn to their 160-cow dairy operation. Their farm is part of the Root River Field to Stream Partnership, which will track the effect farmland conservation practices have on streams. The Dahls are positioning their 160-cow Houston County dairy operation for the future with improvements made possible through the Root River Field to Stream Partnership. On their farm that means a 1.9 million gallon manure storage facility, a calf barn, heifer barn, and sediment control basins and waterways designed to reduce runoff and soil erosion. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Addressing Water Quality Connects Neighbors In Blackhawk Creek Watershed

August 16, 2022
As Clark Porter finished lunch with a farming neighbor at a Crop Production Services facility opening in Grundy[...] View more
× As Clark Porter finished lunch with a farming neighbor at a Crop Production Services facility opening in Grundy County, Iowa, conversation turned to Blackhawk Creek and the Blackhawk Creek Water and Soil Coalition, a group spearhead by Porter and established in February 2017. The neighbor asked if it helped that Porter farmed in the watershed too. Porter said he believed it did. “It gives you credibility,” observed the neighbor. Porter hopes to rely on that credibility as he works to build a sense of community in a watershed with both rural and urban stakeholders – a condition that has led to past conflict in his state. Advocates in the city, where Porter lives, have told him he could serve as a “bridge” across the watershed. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

A model for farmer-driven watershed improvement now asks, “What next?”

August 16, 2022
Jeff Pape and his family chatted over dinner in a Dyersville, Iowa café when a stranger and young[...] View more
× Jeff Pape and his family chatted over dinner in a Dyersville, Iowa café when a stranger and young boy approached their table. “Excuse me,” said the stranger, “but I’d like to introduce my son to the man who’s responsible for cleaning up our stream.” The young dad went on to describe how he’d played near the creek as a child but couldn’t see the bottom then, and how his own son plays in and around it now with no objections from him, because it’s clean. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Proving Collaboration Is Possible

August 16, 2022
Pike County landowners John and Sandy Scherder and Chris Williamson, Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) biologist, have heard[...] View more
× Pike County landowners John and Sandy Scherder and Chris Williamson, Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) biologist, have heard peers in other states say they’re weary of working with people who aren’t proactive, policies that slow projects down, and programs that don’t deliver what’s needed. Missouri has some of the same programs, they say, but the increase in cover cropped acres in Peno Creek watershed has everything to do with cooperation between local partners and the will to connect. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Farmers talking with neighbors is prime driver of success across watersheds

August 16, 2022
Everybody says they care about conservation, but in three small southeastern Minnesota watersheds, farmers stepped up to the[...] View more
× Everybody says they care about conservation, but in three small southeastern Minnesota watersheds, farmers stepped up to the plate to walk the talk. When the Root River Field to Stream Partnership came knocking in 2015, 47 out of 48 farmland owners opened the door. More importantly, they opened their farm gates to the review of their soil and water conservation practices by Ron Meiners, the partnership's technical specialist. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Growing Grassroots Change: Farmer-led conservation is getting a little help from its friends

August 16, 2022
Renovating a drainage ditch got Minnesota farmer Pat Duncanson thinking beyond his field edges, eventually leading to involvement[...] View more
× Renovating a drainage ditch got Minnesota farmer Pat Duncanson thinking beyond his field edges, eventually leading to involvement in Minnesota's Le Sueur River Watershed Partnership. Lakeshore owner demands for buffers led Watertown, Wisconsin farmer Tony Peirick to help start Dodge County Farmers for Healthy Soil-Healthy Water—in part to help reduce phosphorous entering a lake. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Reviving the endangered Topeka shiner minnow

August 16, 2022
The Topeka shiner is a little fish but it has a big story to tell. That story is[...] View more
× The Topeka shiner is a little fish but it has a big story to tell. That story is how fish enthusiasts and farmers are working together to build habitat for this endangered species—and, in that process, are spawning ecological services that help downstream neighbors. The story begins with oxbows. As a stream meanders through its floodplain, some loops get cut off to form an oxbow. They play an important role in a wetlands ecosystem, but many have been filled with sediment as soil eroded from nearby fields. Removing that silt restores the oxbow habitat. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

No-Tillers Take the Lead for Water Quality

August 16, 2022
Wisconsin no-tillers John Eron and Matt Hintz didn’t wait for regulations telling them how to farm. They started[...] View more
× Wisconsin no-tillers John Eron and Matt Hintz didn’t wait for regulations telling them how to farm. They started farmer-led watershed groups to deal directly with local environmental issues and the groups that raised them, not as adversaries, but as advocates. They opened their farm gates to other farmers and non-farmers for field days, sought state grants to run trials of farm-based solutions to the problems and promoted the results. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Coming Together for the Sake of a Creek

August 16, 2022
Rice Creek is important for many reasons. Not the least of these is its status as the westernmost[...] View more
× Rice Creek is important for many reasons. Not the least of these is its status as the westernmost trout stream in Minnesota with a self-sustaining population of brook trout. For Mike Daly, Rice Creek has been a respite in daily life and a connection to his family's 70-year heritage on the land. However, he has also seen the dark side of the creek as torrential rains washed out roads and the stream ran black with silt. More recently, it has taught him the value of a community coming together to protect and improve a valued natural resource. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Oxbow Alchemy Better than Lead into Gold

August 16, 2022
Alchemists once sought to turn lead into gold, but restored river oxbows do even better, improving water quality,[...] View more
× Alchemists once sought to turn lead into gold, but restored river oxbows do even better, improving water quality, creating habitat for diverse life forms and healing our souls. Camille Rogers is reaping these benefits and more, thanks to a statewide oxbow restoration program in Iowa. A coalition of state and federal agencies, as well as The Nature Conservancy, Fishers & Farmers Partnership for the Upper Mississippi River Basin and others, work with landowners to give nature a hand, at no cost to the landowners. Click HERE to read the full story.
×
View other news

Landowner-Led Effort Jumpstarts Conservation Practice Adoption

August 16, 2022
Gary Mullen has fond memories of camping by the banks of Huzzah Creek on the family farm about[...] View more
× Gary Mullen has fond memories of camping by the banks of Huzzah Creek on the family farm about 70 miles southwest of St. Louis, Mo. The third-generation farmer has less than fond memories of the aftermath of the Huzzah flood. Today, with his son Tim and daughter Emily farming alongside him, he knows the conservation practices put in place have made their share of the creek a better place. Doing so also laid the basis for a unique model of cooperation and planning between state and federal conservation agencies, non-profits and landowners that continues today. Click HERE to read the full story.
×

Neighbor to Neighbor | Peno Creek Cooperative Partnership

July 15, 2021
John Scherder planted cover crops in a difficult year, saw their benefits and never turned back. A strategic[...] View more
× John Scherder planted cover crops in a difficult year, saw their benefits and never turned back. A strategic plan turned fisheries biologist Chris Williamson’s attention from Peno Creek to the land, to protect the stream. The two connected in a meeting where listening was the focus. And from there a small group found a way to make trying cover crops easy. In this edition of Fishers & Farmers, Neighbor to Neighbor, Scherder Family Farms owner John Scherder and Missouri Department of Conservation Fisheries regional lead Chris Williamson tell how they connected, how Fishers & Farmers Partnership funding and workshops energized their work, and how they turned a ripple of interest into a wave of cover crop adoption.
×

Boots on the Ground | Seven Mile Creek Watershed Partnership

July 15, 2021
For Seven Mile Creek Watershed Partnership, more than 20 years of meaningful connection, on-farm projects and active public[...] View more
× For Seven Mile Creek Watershed Partnership, more than 20 years of meaningful connection, on-farm projects and active public interest slowed to a thoughtful pause just before the pandemic. Resisting the reflex to charge ahead, project partners used that time to look closely at what is needed now, who is ready to lead, and what practices will help area farming neighbors meet financial, social and conservation goals. In this conversation, meet Seven Mile Creek area farmers Nick Peters and Ben Penner, University of Minnesota manure management specialist Melissa Wilson, Eric Miller, Nicollet County Soil & Water Conservation District watershed technician, and Brad Gordon, southern Minnesota program manager for Great River Greening. Learn how they identified next steps, developed a series of videos featuring local producers and fish specialists, built on area farmers' successful work, and engaged Penner to systematically share his knowledge about integrating new crops such as Kernza in rotations. In this Boots on the Ground with Fishers & Farmers conversation series, meet people who are working together where they live to protect places they care about. Ask questions. Talk with peers. Leave inspired.
×

Neighbor to Neighbor | Women for the Land + Learning Circles for Women Nonoperating Landowners

June 19, 2021
In Livingston County, Illinois, 70-75% of farmland is leased—well above upper Midwest state averages of 40-55%—and a large[...] View more
× In Livingston County, Illinois, 70-75% of farmland is leased—well above upper Midwest state averages of 40-55%—and a large percentage of landowners are female. Becky Taylor leads learning circles there for women landowners, often heirs of local farm families who want to be good land stewards but haven’t previously been responsible for farming decisions, don’t feel comfortable at local farm events, and are not aware of resources available to improve the land. In this edition of Fishers & Farmers, Neighbor to Neighbor Livingston County Soil & Water Conservation District technician Becky Taylor tells how the learning circles work, and how they impact participants and the land. And Gabrielle McNally, director of American Farmland Trust’s Women for the Land program, shares how she is working with local partners to expand learning circles nationwide and meet the needs of new and beginning female farmers.
×

Boots on the Ground | Farmers for Tomorrow

June 17, 2021
A first generation farmer doesn’t have the equity to fail. Matt Hintz has made it work by no-tilling[...] View more
× A first generation farmer doesn’t have the equity to fail. Matt Hintz has made it work by no-tilling 1000 of his 1500 acres and thinking differently about marketing and crop selection. “Success,” he says, “is not yield per acre, but return per acre and sustainability.” In the Tomorrow-Waupaca River Watershed where Matt and his family live, they do not drink their own water. “As a farmer,” he says, “I want to change that.” In this conversation, meet Matt Hintz. Learn how he and neighbors established Farmers for Tomorrow, and are applying what they know about soil health to achieve their water goal together. University of Wisconsin Extension agriculture agent Ken Schroeder will be on hand to share what it takes organizationally to make it work.
×

Boots on the Ground | Polk County Iowa SWCD

May 20, 2021
Polk County Soil & Water Conservation District's board and local partners asked how one effective practice—saturated buffers—could be[...] View more
× Polk County Soil & Water Conservation District's board and local partners asked how one effective practice—saturated buffers—could be scaled from one or two per year to many. The result is a general contractor/bid approach that is on track to install 54 saturated buffers and biofilters in 2021 at lower cost, greater speed, in a way landowners appreciate. In this conversation, meet elected officials Katie Rock and John Norwood, Agricultural Drainage Management Coalition lead Keegan Kult, landowner Lee Tesdell, and Polk County Watershed Coordinator Tanner Puls. Learn how they shaped a new system to meet their goals and share with others. Sharpen your questions by previewing our February 2021 Neighbor to Neighbor podcast featuring this group.
×

Neighbor to Neighbor | Middle Cedar Partnership Project & Black Hawk Creek Coalition

May 15, 2021
Downstream in Iowa’s Middle Cedar Basin, the City of Cedar Rapids faced tragic damage and economic loss after[...] View more
× Downstream in Iowa’s Middle Cedar Basin, the City of Cedar Rapids faced tragic damage and economic loss after a major 2008 flood, and high Nitrogen counts in drinking water sources. Upstream, landowners and farm operators wanted to increase farm resilience and minimize runoff and Nitrogen loss. Some feared regulation. In this edition of Fishers & Farmers, Neighbor to Neighbor, meet City of Cedar Rapids Utilities Environmental Manager Mike Kunst, and Clark Porter, Porter Family Farms manager and Miller Creek Watershed Project coordinator. Learn how good questions in the face of big challenges moved them out of old routines and into a web of connection and action for farms, streams and communities they care about.
×

Neighbor to Neighbor | Farmers of Mill Creek & Petenwell Castle Rock Stewards

April 17, 2021
After presenting at a meeting, farmer John Eron walked up to lakeshore owner Rick Georgeson and said, “You[...] View more
× After presenting at a meeting, farmer John Eron walked up to lakeshore owner Rick Georgeson and said, “You bring lake people to my farm, and I'll bring farmers to your lakes.'" From there a relationship grew that has healed old wounds, opened minds, improved soil and water, energized two communities, and inspired new alliances in the Wisconsin River watershed. Says Eron, “The lake group has given money for a no-till drill and a roller crimper to be rented to farmers for trials. But our greatest successes have come from being silly, noticing people, and dissolving judgements.” Hear how farmer John Eron and sailor Rick Georgeson got involved in something they never expected, and what it’s brought to their lives.
×

Boots on the Ground | Shoal Creek Woodlands for Wildlife

April 15, 2021
Rachel Hopkins uses the word “heartburn” to describe moments when she and her dad, Steve Yokom, size up[...] View more
× Rachel Hopkins uses the word “heartburn” to describe moments when she and her dad, Steve Yokom, size up new conservation practices for their Missouri farm. Both have a keen eye for business, but change can demand a deep swallow. Rachel credits local landowners and conservation managers who had a conversation in 2008 for making it easier. “There wasn’t much trust in the room that day,” she says, “but we needed to hear what was bugging everyone and figure out what we could do together.” The group became Shoal Creek Woodlands for Wildlife, a bottom-up, self-organized farmer-led committee. Fisheries biologist Rob Pulliam, who helped get things started, says, “Everyone participated in scoping our challenge, identifying needs, setting goals and implementing practices.” In this conversation, meet Rachel, Rob and Abigail Lambert, Ozark Land Trust river stewardship manager. Hear how their flexible collaborative gets things done
×

Neighbor to Neighbor | Cannon River Watershed Partnership

March 20, 2021
Eleven farmers who intensively planted cover crops in Minnesota’s Rice Creek watershed since 2018 now see better stream[...] View more
× Eleven farmers who intensively planted cover crops in Minnesota’s Rice Creek watershed since 2018 now see better stream health, fish habitat, water quality, and farm profits. Monitoring shows that cover crops on 27% of tillable acres are keeping 9000 pounds of nitrate and 200,000 pounds of sediment out of the creek every year, and neighbors are taking notice. In this episode of Fishers & Farmers, Neighbor to Neighbor radio, meet producer Tim Little, who adopted cover crops and no-till after many years farming and now wonders why he didn’t think of it sooner. And hear how Al Kraus, conservation program manager at Cannon River Watershed Partnership, is bringing structure and energy to a web of respectful shared wok in one community.
×

Boots on the Ground | Dodge County Farmers for Healthy Soil & Water

March 19, 2021
In 2015 farmer Tony Peirick and lake shore owner Bill Boettge wanted to protect Dodge County, Wisconsin lakes[...] View more
× In 2015 farmer Tony Peirick and lake shore owner Bill Boettge wanted to protect Dodge County, Wisconsin lakes and streams, but dreaded stepping into a nonpoint source work group they feared would be a shouting match. In fact, that’s exactly what happened. But because Tony and Bill connected, planned pontoon rides and cover crop showcases, and cultivated respect and trust among neighbors, Tony now hosts 150 people at soil health events, the lake association pays for cover crops, projects get done, and they’re actually having fun. In this conversation, meet Tony, Bill and county conservationist John Bohonek. Learn how they're opening eyes to the connection between land and water. Says Tony, “It’s been phenomenal to see what happens on farms around the county. I never thought this would happen! It HAS TO happen, and IT IS happening.”
×

Neighbor to Neighbor | Polk County, Iowa SWCD

February 20, 2021
For the past 20 years, Polk County Soil and Water Conservation District has spearheaded Central Iowa watershed efforts.[...] View more
× For the past 20 years, Polk County Soil and Water Conservation District has spearheaded Central Iowa watershed efforts. About nine years ago, saturated buffers emerged as a useful water quality management practice for farms in the area, with one to two installed in the county every year. Because benefits are clear and the need to address water quality is significant, SWCD board members and local partners started asking about new targeted strategies that were faster, better and cheaper: How can green infrastructure be bundled to facilitate more saturated buffer installations every year, instead of one or two? They wanted to stop waiting for landowners to walk in the door and to take an active, focused approach to marketing and delivery.
×

Boots on the Ground | Peno Creek Landowner Council

February 18, 2021
Biologist Chris Williamson didn’t think he’d ever lead a discussion about cover crops, or apply for money for[...] View more
× Biologist Chris Williamson didn’t think he’d ever lead a discussion about cover crops, or apply for money for cover crop seed. But when the Missouri Department of Conservation made Peno Creek a protection priority, his focus became the creek’s agricultural watershed. “In 2013 we knew we wanted to collaborate with farmers,” said Williamson. “But we didn’t know how. That turned out to be a good thing, because instead of developing a program and trying to pitch it, we listened.” In this conversation, meet Williamson, Peno Creek area landowners Curtis Delgman and John Scherder, and MDC’s stream and watershed chief, Sherry Fischer. Hear how this core team connected people, continued to listen, and turned a ripple of interest into a wave of cover crop adoption near Hannibal.
×

Boots on the Ground | Root River Field to Stream Partnership

January 21, 2021
Since 2009, 47 farmers in three small southeast Minnesota watersheds have collaborated to monitor how water and nutrients[...] View more
× Since 2009, 47 farmers in three small southeast Minnesota watersheds have collaborated to monitor how water and nutrients move on their land, and to minimize soil and nutrient loss with targeted on-farm work. Now, what they’ve learned as part of the Root River Field to Stream Partnership is helping others make decisions across the 1 million acre Root River Watershed.   In this conversation meet Ron Meiners, farmer and conservation technician, and Kevin Keuhner, project lead. Hear how they connected with landowners, structured their work, brought in partners, and sustained relationships over time. Ron will take your questions about field walkovers that broadly expanded conservation practices in project areas. 
×

Neighbor to Neighbor | Jo Daviess County Soil & Water Health Coalition

January 16, 2021
The idea of creating a farmer-led group was first floated by Galena, IL resident Beth Baranski, who had[...] View more
× The idea of creating a farmer-led group was first floated by Galena, IL resident Beth Baranski, who had an interest in local land and water issues. This grassroots group is now a monthly circle of friendship and a public forum where farmers, like Greg Thoren, share decades of knowledge about soil health. In this episode, meet Greg and now the group’s organizing secretary, Beth Baranski, who are building connection and watching a northern Illinois community come alive with interest in its land and streams.
×

Neighbor to Neighbor | Tainter Creek Farmer-Led Watershed Council

December 19, 2020
After months of knocking on doors and inviting farmers to talk about local soil and water issues, relationships[...] View more
× After months of knocking on doors and inviting farmers to talk about local soil and water issues, relationships started to form and openness grew. This led to real work—and an established group. Dani Heisler-Wodill of Valley Stewardship Network, who now coordinates for the group, says the Council now has about 30 members representing over 4,000 acres (or 12.5%) of land in Tainter Creek watershed.
×

Boots on the Ground | Cannon River Watershed Partnership

December 17, 2020
A successful cover crop initiative in Minnesota's Rice Creek is  showing dividends in water quality, stream habitat and[...] View more
× A successful cover crop initiative in Minnesota's Rice Creek is  showing dividends in water quality, stream habitat and farm profits. Watershed monitors estimate that the cover crops on 27% of tillable acres are keeping 9000 pounds of nitrate and 200,000 pounds of sediment out of Rice Creek each year. Meet a watershed coordinator, a farmer, two college professors and a member of the SWCD who are breaking down barriers and working together to make all of this happen. This diverse group is managing practices, monitoring the stream, and spreading the word to neighbors.
×

Boots on the Ground | Black Hawk Creek Water & Soil Coalition

November 19, 2020
Meet Clark Porter and Fred Abels, founders of Iowa's Black Hawk Creek Soil & Water Coalition, and current[...] View more
× Meet Clark Porter and Fred Abels, founders of Iowa's Black Hawk Creek Soil & Water Coalition, and current leads Jack Boyer, Vern Fish and Faith Luce. Hear how their local initiative began, what's worked (and hasn't) and how they're building a sustainable basin-wide initiative now. In this new Boots on the Ground Conversation Series, meet people who are working together right where they live to protect places they care about. Ask questions. Talk with peers. Leave inspired.
×
View other news

RFD TV Interview| Fishers & Farmers Combines Sustainable Farming & Stream Management

October 19, 2020
Maintaining water quality is a top concern across the ag industry. A nearly 14 inch brook trout is[...] View more
× Maintaining water quality is a top concern across the ag industry. A nearly 14 inch brook trout is a trophy in most waters, but coming from a small stream in Minnesota farm country, it is even more noteworthy. This creek is showing water quality improvements in part because farmers upstream have made changes to farming practices. Some of those changes have been supported by a program called Fishers and Farmers. Click HERE to see the full interview.
×